If You Want Your Signs Ignored Do Not Follow These Steps or How to Get Your Signage Noticed

So, how do you get your signage noticed? Good question. Businesses, brands, and media are everywhere, and there are lots of signs competing for everyone’s attention. We pass hundreds upon hundreds of signs daily, but how many do we see? And what makes those signs we notice stand out? It may be because someone thought about what potential customers would see. If you don’t consider the following points chances are your sign won’t accomplish what it’s intended to do.

How to Get Your Signage Noticed

Location

Your choices will be governed by local ordinances, so be aware of what is allowed. Before designing the sign, determine the best place to install it. For example, if the front of your building is on a side road and the back is on a major thoroughfare – where do you put a sign? Probably both. The largest allowable and most affordable in the rear, and a smaller identifying sign at your storefront.

Content

Most people are inclined to put too much information on signs. What traffic passes your sign? How much time do they have to view it — a few seconds at most?  What is the primary message or call to action? What do you wish to share about your organization? If you were only allowed 20 characters, what would they be? I know you’re not that coffee company out of Seattle, but we all know what to expect when we see that green and white siren. So, use the KISS method (Keep-It-Simple-Stupid).

Color

Do a little research. Are there traditional colors for your industry? For example, have you ever noticed how many fast food restaurants use yellow and red? Consider the psychology of color: Black is probably not a good color for a toy store, and bright red would be inappropriate for a funeral parlor.

What’s Your Sign’s Purpose?

Why do you have a sign? Is it to drive new business, provide directions as a wayfinder, share your story, promote your product or service — all the above? Taking the time to calculate the best location, content, and color of your sign is a big step towards achieving your goal. If you’re uncertain as to the answers to these three questions, find an experienced sign shop to help you.

How Important is Pretty?

Don’t get me wrong pretty can be good, and sometimes signs need prettied up, but not when it gets in the way of the sign’s effectiveness. As Lee Faulkner, TKO Signs says, “Pretty isn’t always good.” Good sign design tells a story, and its language is color, placement, and design. Allowing pretty to take priority over telling a story often leads to an ineffective sign. A sign should be appealing; it should have an impact, and it should be immediately legible, but it should also create emotion, and share a story.

A Sign Has a Job to do

Driving home from work, I pass a local retailer whose sign uses a script font. I’m certain it’s the businesses logo, and while they may get away with it on letterhead, it doesn’t work on the sign — I can’t read it. It’s pretty, but illegible, the sign gets in the way of itself.

Sometimes Pretty is Important

Designing an effective sign isn’t always a quick process. Lee was recently designing a sign that highlighted a farm animal that when you took notice of it— it wasn’t a very attractive creature. What, at first glance, looked to be an easy design took much longer, but when Lee was done the critter had road appeal. In this case pretty was important.

So, How Do You Get Your Signage Noticed? 

How do you get your signage noticed? The key to answering the question is — don’t let pretty OR ugly detract from the message of your sign. When pretty gets in the way of the story, it lessens the signs ability to connect with consumers, and if it’s ugly, folks will look away. If you’d like to learn more about signs Contact Us because we make pretty effective signs.

 

2018-12-12T15:53:46+00:00By |Signs for Business|

About the Author:

Randy Clark is the Director of Communications at TKO Graphix, where he regularly blogs for TKO's Brandwire. Randy is passionate about social media, leadership development, and flower gardening. He is a beer geek and, on weekends, he fronts the rock band, Under The Radar. He is the proud father of one educator, one principal, has four amazing grandchildren, and a public speaker wife who puts up with him. His twitter handle is: @randyclarktko, Facebook: Randy Clarktko, Google+: Randy Clark on G+

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